Cat Tyc

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Cat Tyc is a Brooklyn based writer/artist.  She has two chapbooks, one from Dancing Girl Press called An Architectural Seance and the other from Belladonna Collaborative called CONSUMES ME.

Her video work has screened locally and internationally at spaces that include the Microscope Gallery, Anthology Film Archives, CUNY Graduate Center, Brooklyn Museum, Hauser & Wirth, and Kassel Fest. She has directed music videos that have been added to the rotation on LOGO's NewNowNext and MTVu.

She co-curates the Poet Transmit which engages in the connections between poetry, transmission, and performance to explore textual practice and modes of transmission and how poetry exists in expanded fields of time. Events have been held at St. Mark’s Poetry Project, Knockdown Center and MOMA Ps1.

She teaches multimedia composition at Baruch and Marymount Manhattan College and works as co-director at The Home School in Hudson, NY.

Fred Moten

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Fred Moten is a teacher and writer whose areas of study and practice include Black Literary, Aural and Visual Culture, Critical Theory, Performance Studies, and Poetry and Poetics. He is especially concerned with the social force and social origins of black expressive cultural practices. In particular, Moten is interested in the relation between insurgent social movement and experimental art, and has been preoccupied with understanding these fields of endeavor as indissolubly linked and irreducibly popular.

Over the last 25 years, Moten has addressed these concerns, by way of poetry and criticism, in a number of books, including In the Break: The Aesthetics of the Black Radical Tradition (University of Minnesota Press, 2003); Hughson's Tavern (Leon Works, 2009); B. Jenkins (Duke University Press, 2010); The Feel Trio (Letter Machine Editions, 2014); The Little Edges (Wesleyan University Press, 2015); The Service Porch (Letter Machine Editions, 2016); and consent not to be a single being (Duke University Press, 2017, 2018).

Moten is engaged in long-term collaborations with theorist Stefano Harney and artist Wu Tsang. With Harney, he is co-author of The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning and Black Study (Minor Compositions/Autonomedia, 2013) and A Poetics of the Undercommons (Sputnik and Fizzle, 2016), and with Tsang, Who touched me? (If I Can't Dance, I Don't Want to be Part of Your Revolution, 2016). Tsang and Moten are also co-workers in the project Gravitational Feel, iterations of which have been shown or performed at venues including If I Can't Dance I Don't Want To Be A Part of Your Revolution, Amsterdam, Netherlands; Tate Modern, London, United Kingdom; and the New Museum, New York. Moten has also collaborated with the artists and artist collectives Arika, Freethought, Andrea Geyer, Arthur Jafa, MPA, Ultra-red, and Suné Woods.

He teaches in the Department of Performance Studies at New York University.

Jackie Wang

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Jackie Wang is a student of the dream state, black studies scholar, prison abolitionist, poet, performer, library rat, trauma monster and PhD student at Harvard University.

In her book Carceral Capitalism (Semiotext(e)/Intervention, 2018), Wang examines contemporary incarceration techniques and illustrates various aspects of the carceral continuum, including the biopolitics of juvenile delinquency, predatory and algorithmic policing, the political economy of fees and fines, and cybernetic governance.

She is also the author of a number of punkzines including On Being Hard Femme, as well as a collection of dream poems titled Tiny Spelunker of the Oneiro-Womb (Capricious).

Dawn Lundy Martin

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Dawn Lundy Martin is Professor of English in the Writing Program at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the author of several books and chapbooks including: A Gathering of Matter / A Matter of Gathering (University of Georgia Press, 2007), selected by Carl Phillips for the Cave Canem Prize; DISCIPLINE (Nightboat Books, 2011), which was selected by Fanny Howe for the Nightboat Books Poetry Prize and a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize; Candy, a limited edition letterpress chapbook (Albion Books, 2011); The Main Cause of the Exodus (O’clock Press 2014); and The Morning Hour, selected by C.D. Wright for the 2003 Poetry Society of America’s National Chapbook Fellowship. Life in a Box is a Pretty Life, was published by Nightboat Books in 2015 and won the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Poetry. Her latest collection, Good Stock / Strange Blood was published by Coffee House Press in 2017. Her creative nonfiction can be found in The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazinen+1, and boundary 2. She is currently at work on a memoir.

In 2016, Martin co-founded, with poet Terrance Hayes, the Center for African American Poetry and Poetics (CAAPP) at the University of Pittsburgh. She serves as the center's Director. A creative think tank for African American and African diasporic poetry and poetics, CAAPP brings together a diversity of poets, writers, scholars, artists, and community members who are thinking through black poetics as a field that investigates the contemporary moment as it is impacted by historical artistic and social repressions and their respondent social justice movements.

With Vivien Labaton, Martin also co-edited The Fire This Time: Young Activists and the New Feminism (Anchor Books, 2004), which uses a gender lens to describe and theorize young activist work in the U.S. She is the co-founder of the Third Wave Foundation (New York), an organization, which was for 15 years the only young activist feminist foundation in the U.S. Martin continues her activist work in collaboration with foundations and activist organizations to research and strategize about protecting the lives and freedoms of women and girls. Using a intersectional lenses that bring together feminism with racial justice and LGBT rights, Martin works to provide analytical frameworks that assist philanthropic organizations in strategic philanthropy to level the playing field and animate social justice reforms.

Martin’s current creative-scholarly work operates in the intersecting fields of experimental poetics, video installation, and performance. Letters to the Future: BLACK WOMEN / Radical WRITING, co-edited with Erica Hunt, was published in 2018 by Kore Press. Her video installation work has been featured at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit. In 2016 she was awarded an Investing in Professional Artists Grant from the Pittsburgh Foundation and the Heinz Endowments. Martin has also written a libretto for a video installation opera, titled "Good Stock on the Dimension Floor," featured in the 2014 Whitney Biennial, and collaborated with architect Mitch McEwen on Detroit Opera House, a conceptual architecture project. She is the recipient of a 2018 NEA grant for Creative Writing. She is also a co-founder of the Black Took Collective, an experimental performance art/poetry group of three.

Anne Boyer

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Anne Boyer is a poet and essayist from Kansas City. Her poetry books include The Romance of Happy Workers, My Common Heart, and Garments Against Women.  Her newest book is a collection of essays, fables, and ephemera called  A Handbook of Disappointed Fate. The Undying, a memoir about cancer, care, and having a body inside of history is forthcoming in fall 2019 from FSG.  Her honors include the 2018 Cy Twombly Award for Poetry from the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, a 2018 Whiting Award in nonfiction and poetry, the 2018-19 Judith E. Wilson poetry fellowship at Cambridge University, and the 2016 CLMP award for Garments Against Women. She is an Associate Professor of the Liberal Arts at the Kansas City Art Institute where she teaches literature, philosophy, and writing.  

CAConrad

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CA Conrad is a 2019 Creative Capital Fellow, and the author of 9 books of poetry and essays.  While Standing in Line for Death (Wave Books), received the 2018 Lambda Award.  A recipient of a Pew Fellowship in the Arts, they also received The Believer Magazine Book Award and The Gil Ott Book Award. Their work has been translated into Spanish, Greek, Polish, Norwegian, Portuguese, Danish and German.  They teach regularly at Columbia University in NYC, and Sandberg Art Institute in Amsterdam and their poetry can be found online at http://bit.ly/88CAConrad

Ariana Reines

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Named one of Flavorwire's 100 best living writers and "a crucial voice of her generation" by Michael Silverblatt, Ariana Reines is a poet, playwright, performing artist, and translator.  Her books include The Cow (Alberta Prize, Fence 2006), Coeur de Lion (Mal-O-Mar 2007, Fence 2011); Mercury (Fence 2011), and The Origin of the World (Semiotext(e) for the Whitney Biennial 2014).  A SAND BOOK, her next poetry collection, is forthcoming in June 2019 from Tin House. Her newest book is TELEPHONE (2018) based on her Obie-winning first play (2009) commissioned by The Foundry Theatre and recently performed in Norwegian translation (2017) and at KW Berlin (2018). FRANCESCA, a play by Nathalie Rozanes based on writings & performances by Reines premiered at the National Theatre of Belgium in 2016. Other performance & theatrical works include: MORTAL KOMBAT (2015), commissioned by Le Mouvement Biel/Bienne & performed at The Whitney Museum, New York, NY, USA, & Gallery TPW, Toronto, CA, and LORNA (2013) at Martin E. Segal Theatre, New York, USA, both in collaboration with Jim Fletcher, The Origin of the World (2013) at Modern Art, London UK, & many others. Two-person and group exhibitions include SPERM CULT (2018-19) at LAXART, PUBIC SPACE (2016), a collaboration with Oscar Tuazon at Modern Art in London, UK, EXHAUST (2016) at Contemporary Art Tasmania, AU, and JANE DARK (2014) at Western Front, Vancouver, CA.  Reines is the translator of Baudelaire’s My Heart Laid Bare (Mal-O-Mar, 2009); Jean-Luc Hennig’s The Little Black Book of Grisélidis Réal: Days and Nights of an Anarchist Whore (Semiotext(e) 2009); and Tiqqun’s Preliminary Materials Toward a Theory of the Young-Girl (Semiotext(e) 2012). She has taught at Columbia University, the European Graduate School, NYU, Tufts, Naropa, The New School, Yale & many other places. In 2009 she was Roberta C. Holloway Lecturer in Poetry at the University of California-Berkeley.  Her poetry, essays, & interviews have appeared in Artforum, Art in America, The Believer, The Boston Review, Bomb, Granta, Harpers, The Los Angeles Review of Books, & many others.  She has been a MacDowell Fellow, a resident at the TS Eliot House, a fellow at The Center for the Humanities at Tufts, a Brown Foundation Fellow at the Dora Maar House, the Poetry Fellow at the University of East Anglia (UK), has judged the National Poetry Series, & is a nominator for the Foundation for Contemporary Art. Ariana works with writers and artists through her astrology consultancy at lazyeyehaver.com.

James Allister Sprang

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James Allister Sprang is a first-generation Caribbean-American based in Philadelphia, who creates work that exists in gallery spaces, theater spaces and the space generally found between the ears. Working across mediums—photography, sound, duration, installation—Sprang’s work is a rigorous parallax of new media storytelling informed by the poetry of the black experimental tradition. 

After graduating from the Cooper Union, Sprang inserted himself into the downtown New York experimental theater scene under the guise of GAZR (pronounced “gazer”) —a poet-turned-rapper that utilizes histories of black music production and the constructs of theater to explore the latency of language. Sprang received his MFA from the University of Pennsylvania and has shown/performed work at institutions such as the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago, David Nolan Gallery, Abrons Arts Center, The Public Theater, The Apollo Theater, the Brooklyn Museum, Knockdown Center, Pioneer Works, and The Kitchen.